Month: December 2018

The toppermost of the poppermost.

After debuting at #9 last week, WHAT WE LOST IN THE FLOOD is now sitting at the top of CJAM’s charts. I have no idea how that happened so fast.

Every non-compilation album I’ve made since 2004 has found its way onto the CJAM charts at some point. I thought those days were over when AFTERTHOUGHTS got off to an inauspicious start, but that one ended up charting too. It just took a little longer than usual.

That’s fourteen years of consistent chart appearances. That’s insane. What makes it even crazier is knowing almost no one who was playing my music in the beginning is still at the station. I think Adam Peltier and Dave Konstantino were around back in 2004. That’s about it. Somehow, with all the changes in personnel over the years, there’s never been a drop-off in support for the noises I make.

Many thanks to Dave, Adam, Ron, Carley, Brady, and anyone else who might have given the new album some airplay when I wasn’t looking. Thanks also to Dan MacDonald for playing “Pop Song #82” on The River (93.9) Sunday night. It’s always great fun to hear one of my tunes punching through the airwaves at an unexpected spot on the radio dial.

I’ve been trying to take some of the energy that went into finishing FLOOD and funnel it into this YEAR OF THE SLEEPWALK thing. Keeping the momentum going has been a little hit-and-miss. There has been some progress, though. Close to forty songs exist as either rough or final mixes, and most of them are going on the album. If I can double that number and make them all final mixes, I might be just about home. I’m tempted to post some of the video segments I’ve been editing along the way, but I don’t want to give away too many more surprises before the album is ready, so I might sit on those until the time comes to integrate them into the longest video progress report of all time.

Booze and the blowens cop the lot.

Ricky Jay passed away a week ago. He was seventy-two.

You probably know him as Burt Reynolds’ right hand man in Boogie Nights. He had a number of memorable supporting roles in films like House of Games, The Prestige, and Magnolia. One of my favourite bits of acting he did was as cardsharp Eddie Sawyer, a recurring character through the first season of Deadwood.

Ricky was much more than a character actor. He wrote the wonderful Deadwood episode “Jewel’s Boot Is Made for Walking”. He was an incredible, charismatic sleight of hand artist. He lectured and wrote books about magic, and served as a consultant on a number of Hollywood films.

The above performance is Ricky Jay and His 52 Assistants, written by Ricky and filmed by David Mamet in 1996. It’s well worth an hour of your time whether you’re into card tricks or not (I’m not, and I still found it riveting). The man was a born performer — a poet with a deck of cards and a historian in love with his craft. We won’t see his like again.